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How to stay safe during Halloween adventures

How to stay safe during Halloween adventures


Tonight will be quite busy in suburban areas, as many children and their parents will be out trick-or-treating, while many drivers will be going to parties to celebrate the holiday. While everyone aims to be safe, there can be some things that need to be done to ensure everyone gets home happy and healthy.

Nearly 40 percent of fatal collisions on Halloween night in 2011 occurred as a result of a driver with a blood alcohol level of 0.08 or higher, according to a report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Nearly one-quarter of those pedestrians killed on the road were due to a drunk driver, while nearly 10 percent of crashes that involved a fatality were with a pedestrian.

There are multiple ways that drivers can help lower their chances of an accident on the holiday, and the preparation for nights like these should be more than just grabbing a solid car insurance policy.

While driving, it is necessary for motorists to avoid driving under the influence of alcohol, the NHTSA warned. The best way to do this is to consider planning on having a friend or family member being a designated driver. However, there are other ways too, such as calling a taxi, taking advantage of public transportation or looking into sober riding programs.

When in neighborhoods, it is important to not drive quickly, the report explained. These areas may have a notable amount of foot traffic, so it is smart to drive cautiously, eliminate all distractions and pay extra attention. Whenever leaving driveways and alleys, go slowly to prevent running into anything.

Young pedestrians can be distracted
Whether it is a holiday like Halloween or not, drivers who are around areas with children walking need to be careful.

Approximately 20 percent of students in high school cross the street while not paying attention and distracted by some type of device, according to a report from Safe Kids Worldwide. Nearly 40 percent of students who are crossing the street are distracted by their cell phones, especially typing on them. Another 39 percent are listening to headphones, which can cut down their awareness.

Speaking on the phone is another issue, as 20 percent of children are doing this instead of paying attention to traffic, the report added.

Drivers who often have to travel around schools and other areas that have high traffic flow - whether from cars or pedestrians - may want to reexamine their auto insurance situation.



 
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