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Many drivers prefer to write directions down

Many drivers prefer to write directions down


Driver safety is very important on the road, and it goes beyond just having a solid car insurance policy. Distractions can be numerous, so it is essential to avoid these behind the wheel and watch out for other motorists who may be driving and not paying full attention. Some may be taking this information to heart.

Approximately 31 percent of drivers ensure they write down their directions, or print them out on the road instead of using their phones, according to a report from Mintel. Just 25 percent of those polled explained they use their phones.

"Those who haven't shopped for a new car in the past 5 years may be surprised to find out that a technological coup has taken place on the vehicle dash," said Colin Bird, automotive analyst at Mintel. "Gone are tactile controls and, in their stead, many automakers are now offering touchscreens with interactive controls that allow for much of the same functionality that one would find on a smartphone or tablet computer."

Nearly 60 percent of motorists noted that they think using a cellphone while on the road is a distracting activity, the report explained. Meanwhile, more drivers have an interest in using vehicles that have built-in communication options. Approximately 36 percent noted they would like a steering wheel with controls that are mounted.

Older motorists may drive distracted
There is a perception that many drivers who talk on cellphones or use them for other purposes in the car are young people. However, there may be a growing level of older Americans who are also doing this. According to a report from State Farm, those who use the Internet on their phone while driving rose to 24 percent this year, up from 13 percent in 2009.

The percentage of those who own smartphones is growing in every age group, with 86 percent of those between the ages of 30 and 39 reporting this, the survey explained. This was the same level as those who were between the ages of 18 and 29.

"As smart phone ownership increases for all age groups, the safety community must ensure we are keeping pace with our understanding of the types of distractions drivers face," said Chris Mullen, director of technology research at State Farm.

Drivers may want to look at their auto insurance policy in order to ensure they are properly protected in the case of an accident.




 
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