ATTENTION! You are using Internet Explorer 8 or older, which we will not be supporting after April 14, 2015.
We strongly encourage you to upgrade your browser to a newer version by following these simple steps.
Many drivers still use vehicles while tired

Many drivers still use vehicles while tired

Police Tape in Front of Car Accident

There are many dangers for motorists on the road, and this may be one driving force behind getting a strong auto insurance policy. One of these is the notable level of distracted drivers on the road, and this could be an ongoing issue.

There is a growing level of drowsy driving from drivers between 19 and 24 years of age, according to a recent report from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. This level reached 33 percent, which was higher than any other group. Both those who were the oldest drivers or just starting out had the lowest level, with just 22 percent.

"Drowsy driving remains a significant threat to the motoring public, with many drivers underestimating the problem of driving while extremely tired, and overestimating their ability to deal with it," said Peter Kissinger, president and CEO of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. "Driving while fatigued is dangerous because it slows reaction time, impairs vision and causes lapses in judgment, similar to driving drunk. We know that people can't reliably predict when they are going to fall asleep, and a very fatigued driver may fall asleep for several seconds without even realizing it."

Despite these issues, 95 percent of motorists felt that driving while tired was not something anyone should do, the report explained. Nearly 85 percent felt that drivers who participate in this practice are putting themselves at risk.

Driving while sleepy is something that has resulted in many crashes, with serious consequences. A report conducted by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety in 2010 noted that 17 percent of crashes that involved a fatality had a tired motorist, while 13 percent of those collisions that had a person hospitalized also involved this type of driving.

Parents deny that their children drive distracted
While many parents may be looking to protect their child's new vehicle with a car insurance policy, they may need to do more work to ensure that safety is the number one concern on the road. According to a report from Bridgestone Americas, less than 40 percent of parents noted they think their child uses a phone while driving, which is lower than the 50 percent of teens who say they do this.

Only 25 percent of parents think their children text while driving, but close to half of young people admitted to doing this practice, the report added.



 
Get Your
Quote



or retrieve an online quote
Find a store

Get Your
Quote
or retrieve an online quote

We’re more than just great insurance. Follow us for some pleasant surprises.
Connect with us on Facebook Connect with us on Twitter Connect with us on YouTube Connect with us on Instagram
©2016 Direct General